Blood Upon the Sand: The Armenian Genocide in World War I

On April 29, 1915, sandwiched between advertisements for “Groves Tasteless Chill Tonic” and “Chamberlain’s Tablets” near the bottom of page two of the Thursday edition of the Pensacola Journal (column five), was a short report on the Turkish arrest of hundreds of Armenian residents of Constantinople (Istanbul), the capital of the Ottoman Empire. The obscure placement of the article must have made sense to the editors given other dramatic stories reported that day. America was at peace, but Europe and much of the world was in the ninth month of World War I. The small Pensacola paper dutifully relayed the developments in that week’s landing of Allied troops along the Gallipoli Peninsula in an attempt to wrest control of the Dardanelles from Turkish troops and seize Constantinople, a campaign designed to knock the Ottoman Empire out of the war on the road to the defeat of that country and its ally, Germany.

When it was Over Over There: Florida Soldiers and the End of World War I

Today we bring you a guest post by R. Boyd Murphree, Project Manager, Florida Family and Community History, Digital Services and Shared Collections, University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries. He can be contacted at bmurphree@ufl.edu and is also on Twitter @boyd_murphree. November 11, 1918, the last day of World War I, was anything butContinue reading When it was Over Over There: Florida Soldiers and the End of World War I

“Ship Went Down With All On Board”: Remembering the USS Tampa

Today we bring you a guest post by R. Boyd Murphree, Project Manager, Florida Family and Community History, Digital Services and Shared Collections, University of Florida, George A. Smathers Libraries. He can be contacted at bmurphree@ufl.edu and is also on Twitter @boyd_murphree. As the end of the centennial of World War I approaches (November 11,Continue reading “Ship Went Down With All On Board”: Remembering the USS Tampa

Memorial Days in early 20th Century Florida

Memorial Day means different things to different people. For many, it is the unofficial start to the summer season filled with grilling and celebration. For others, it is a day to solemnly reflect on the sacrifices made by those fighting in the Armed Forces. The holiday, which emerged during the Civil War, reflects the needs,Continue reading Memorial Days in early 20th Century Florida